American Doctor Gives Up Ebola Serum to Save Colleague

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Dr. Kent Brantly With His Family

Dr. Kent Brantly, an American doctor who is suffering from Ebola in Liberia, has bravely given up a serum in an attempt to save his colleague Nancy Writebol.  Dr. Brantly was in Liberia on a missionary trip when the Ebola oubtreak began, and he was soon battling for his life.

Charity organization Samaritan’s Purse managed to get a serum sent to Liberia for Dr. Brantly, but since it was only enough for one person, he declined so that his fellow aid worker, who was also battling the horrific disease, could be treated.  His health has since gone “taken a slight turn for the worse” overnight, while Writebol is in stable but serious condition.

Turkish Women Defy “No Public Laughter” Speech

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One of the Many Selfies That Can Be Found With #direnkahkaha

Turkish women have bravely been defying an absurd speech from Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc.  In the speech, Arinc hits out against “moral corruption” and argues that women should not laugh in public.  His argument is that laughter is too “inviting” and doesn’t protect a woman’s “chasteness”.

The reaction from Turkish women has been inspiring, as #direnkahkaha (resist, laugh) has spread throughout Instagram and Twitter, with women taking pictures of themselves laughing in public.  Arinc’s speech has been rightfully slammed, with one opposition leader saying, “we need the laugh the happy laughter of women.”

Top Ebola Victim Dies as Disease Spreads

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Doctor Khan Selflessly Helped Over 100 Patients Before Succumbing to the Disease Himself

Sierra Leone’s top Ebola doctor, Sheik Umar Khan, has died after treating more than 100 patients as the horrific disease continues to spread with doctors fearing the world could be about to witness the worst outbreak in history.  Health officials admitted they did not have all a list of everyone a Liberian patient came in contact with before dying from the disease, which means the outbreak could continue to grow rapidly.

The 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak is already the deadliest in history, with 672 deaths from the disease, and at least 1,201 cases.  Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea have been the worst hit countries, but it has already spread, with Nigeria recently seeing its first death.  Doctors fear if the disease spreads to the heavily populated Nigerian city of Lagos, the seventh-fastest growing city in the world, it could become out of control.